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Street Cleaning: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

  1. Why did Redwood City reduce neighborhood street cleaning from every other week to once a month?
  2. What are the details of the reduction in the Residential Street Cleaning Program?
  3. After reviewing the information provided about the street cleaning schedule, what should I do if I still cannot determine my street cleaning week and day?
  4. What should I do if I do not see my address listed?
  5. What are “unimproved” streets and why are these streets not included in the Street Cleaning Program?
  6. Why are private streets excluded from the Street Cleaning Program?
  7. I live on a private or unimproved street, so city staff does not clean the street in front of my house. Why am I receiving information about the City’s Residential Street Cleaning Program?
  8. How were the street cleaning district boundaries determined?
  9. Does city staff enforce “No Parking” for street cleaning?
  10. With the reduced street cleaning schedule won’t more debris collect on the streets causing the storm drains to clog and flood?
  11. Why would the street sweeper operator clean one side of my street but not the other side of the street on the same day?

  1. Why did Redwood City reduce neighborhood street cleaning from every other week to once a month?
    As the local economy has slumped, city revenues have also declined, requiring expenditure reductions in programs that are supported by General Fund monies. Because street cleaning is one of the services supported entirely by the general fund, a reduction in this service is necessary.
  2. What are the details of the reduction in the Residential Street Cleaning Program?
    The Public Works Division had to reduce its expenditures from the General Fund by seven percent (7%) beginning July 1, 2003. To accomplish this, the Division froze one sweeper operator position, removing it from the budget and removed one sweeper from service. Additionally, the Street Cleaning Program no longer has a holiday make up schedule. This means that if your regular street cleaning day falls on a scheduled holiday (city offices are closed), the street cleaning will not be scheduled for a subsequent make up day.
  3. After reviewing the information provided about the street cleaning schedule, what should I do if I still cannot determine my street cleaning week and day?
    Call the Public Works Division at 650-780-7464 or email streetcleaning@redwoodcity.org  and we will gladly provide you with the information. Please be prepared to provide us with your street address.
  4. What should I do if I do not see my address listed?
    There are three circumstances that would exclude your street from the Street Cleaning Program: (1) your street is a private street, (2) your street is an unimproved street or (3) your street is in an unincorporated part of San Mateo County. If these situations do not apply to your street, call the Public Works Division at 650-780-7464 or email: streetcleaning@redwoodcity.org and we will gladly provide you with the information. Please be prepared to provide us with your street address.
  5. What are “unimproved” streets and why are these streets not included in the Street Cleaning Program?
    Unimproved streets are ones that were not built to City design standards. These streets do not have curb and gutter or storm drainage facilities. The street sweeping equipment is designed to use the curb and gutter to trap debris in its brushes and vacuum system.
  6. Why are private streets excluded from the Street Cleaning Program?
    Privately owned streets are managed and maintained by private parties or individuals, i.e. a homeowner associations or private property owners. These streets typically are not built to Redwood City’s design standards and are intended for the exclusive use of the private property owners that maintain them. Publicly funded services are not provided on these streets.
  7. I live on a private or unimproved street, so city staff does not clean the street in front of my house. Why am I receiving information about the City’s Residential Street Cleaning Program?
    All Redwood City residents, whether their residence is on a public, private or unimproved street are being informed about the program because nearly every resident or visitor to Redwood City uses the public roadways maintained by city staff. Redwood City wants all of its residents to be aware of the efforts made to keep our streets clean.
  8. How were the street cleaning district boundaries determined?
    The boundaries of the street cleaning district are the same as the boundary of the neighborhood associations of Redwood City. Most large neighborhoods are divided into two districts, to accommodate what realistically can be cleaned within a 10-hour day. For instance, Roosevelt is a large neighborhood and is divided into two smaller districts “B” and “D” meaning that one portion of the neighborhood is cleaned during “B Week” and the other portion is cleaned during “D Week.”
  9. Does city staff enforce “No Parking” for street cleaning?
    No. “No Parking” for street cleaning is not enforced at this time. Enforcement of parking restrictions for street cleaning would require a large expenditure of resources, both financial and personnel. The costs to make and place signs on city streets, and the need for enforcement personnel for ticketing and/or towing are prohibitive, especially under current budget limitations.
  10. With the reduced street cleaning schedule won’t more debris collect on the streets causing the storm drains to clog and flood?
    It is likely that more leaves and debris will remain on the street, which could contribute to clogging storm drains and catch basins during the rains. The reduction in service is unfortunate, but economically necessary. City crews cleaned all of Redwood City’s 2,685 inlets and catch basins, cleaned the trash racks and serviced the storm system’s 17pump stations prior to October 1, 2003. Before, during and after a storm, city crews conduct inspections and clean catch basins, inlets, channels and pump stations. The crews will continue to be vigilant and respond to calls to clear clogged storm drains. Public Works personnel appreciate that residents call to report clogged drains and catch basins during the rains.
  11. Why would the street sweeper operator clean one side of my street but not the other side of the street on the same day?
    Some streets are “border” streets; that means they are the boundary that separates one street cleaning district from another. The street cleaning districts are designed to include a practical number of curb miles that will allow the sweeper operator to complete an entire district in one day. More than likely your street is a border street separating your cleaning district from another. This may offer residents living on border streets the opportunity to forge agreements among themselves to move cars to the unscheduled side of the street (in front of your across-the-street neighbor, for example) until after the street sweeper passes.


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